Comfrey (Symphytum officinale)

Comfrey (Symphytum officinale)

Even though this plant contains poisonous chemicals called pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), the leaf, root, and root-like stem (rhizome) are used to make medicine. The amount of PAs found in comfrey changes according to the time of harvesting and the age of the plant. The roots have 10 times higher amounts of PAs than the leaves. - use with caution.
Comfrey is applied to the skin for ulcers, wounds, joint inflammation, bruises, rheumatoid arthritis, swollen veins (phlebitis), gout, and fractures.
Comfrey is rather comtraversial and many health experts do not advise that you drink it, however fans of the herbal treatment make comfrey tea, allow it to cool, and apply it topically to the skin or to areas of the body where aches and pains are present.
Comfrey has also been consumed as a tea for upset stomach, ulcers, heavy menstrual periods, diarrhea, bloody urine, persistent cough, painful breathing (pleuritis), bronchitis, cancer, and chest pain (angina). It is also used as a gargle for gum disease and sore throat.
- use with caution.
What’s more, comfrey is known for accelerating the composting process and enriching soil.
Comfrey is a wonderful composting agent, considered a powerhouse in the permaculture garden.
Comfrey tea can encourages better flowering as well as more vigorous growth in perennials and mature fruiting vegetable plants (i.e., tomatoes, peppers, potatoes, cucumbers). Do not use comfrey compost tea on young plants
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